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When is a requirement not a requirement? March 11, 2013

Posted by Ivor's Window to the IT and CRM World in Management, Microsoft CRM, Sales Management, Training.
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When is a requirement not a requirement?

I was involved with a company in the medical field who had patients allocated to them by the Ministry of Health, it was their responsibility thereafter to look after the patients and handle the medical care and on-going treatment.

When we undertook the analysis for a new Microsoft Dynamics CRM system which was to be used to manage the patients journey through the organisation the subject of a “Waiting List” came up in the workshops.

From the time that the referral was received until the patient was first seen and processed could sometimes be a few days to a week or two, and during this time effectively the patient was on a waiting list. The organisation vehemently opposed this concept and did not want any reference of this in the new system. It had negative connotations and they really did not want to face up to the reality that it was what it was. The existing process had the prospective patients randomly placed on personal Excel Worksheets that had no management visibility until they were ready to be entered into the old system.

We were not going to continue down this Excel path, therefore in the new system required a solution to this issue, we ended up with the Lead entity in Microsoft CRM being rebranded as Referrals with a status of Not Processed and In Progress with dates for each status.

Management then used a view of all Referrals where the status was Not Processed and used this as a method of managing the time it was taking to deal with patients. So as much as they tried to hide the requirement the data showed that there was in fact a requirement and the only sticking point was in effect the terminology used. When we upgraded to 2011, Management had a dashboard graph of this view and therefore actually had a Waiting List after all.

This is blog number 9 in the series “The more things change the more they stay the same”.

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