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Can you actually call on all your customers? October 30, 2014

Posted by Ivor's Window to the IT and CRM World in Management, Microsoft CRM 2013, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, Sales Management.
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Recently a customer of mine mentioned that with the roll out of CRM they were getting lots of data from the sales team to be imported to the new system. These are contacts and customers. The issue was that in some cases there were more than 500 names in the lists provided and the thinking was that they will never realistically call on all of these customers.

This got me thinking, I then created a small Excel model into which I categorised customers based on how often they need to be called on by percentage. Therefore 5% of the customers need to be called on twice a month etc. These numbers are sensible for organisations that continually get repeat business from their customers. This also takes into account the traditional 80:20 rule.

Twice a Month 5%

Once a month   15%

Once every 2 months    20%

Once every 3 months    25%

Once every 6 months    35%

If you apply this across a customer base the following is quite interesting:

To call on 100 customers using this model you will need to make 12 calls per week. 200 customers would be 25 calls a week and 500 would be 61 calls a week.

This does not take into consideration annual leave, illness, public holidays and other time away from front line selling and or prospecting for new business which ultimately bloats this number.

So therefore I wonder, how many of your customers are getting neglected because the sales team physically cannot get around to the them all?

My recommendation, do the numbers, count number of customers by owner in the CRM system and see if it is realistically possible that all the customers can get called on based on your own specific metrics, if not maybe some alternative strategies of telesales and nurture marketing could supplement the real time calls that are required.

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